Jordan on LeBron’s Decision: ‘You Don’t Even Know the Half of It’

Nearly three weeks have passed since LeBron announced that he was leaving.  The Cavs joined the trade season this week and the front office, despite Dan Gilbert’s letter, quickly moved on from LeBron as they worked the phones, scouted Summer League, and stood their ground in negotiations with free agents.  The fans, while they will likely never forgive or forget, are starting to move on.  The fraternity of former superstars – those who built the modern NBA – continue to grumble.  This includes Michael Jordan, who, according to Michael Wilbon, has displayed about “one percent of the steam rising from [him].”

Wilbon maintains a close friendship with many of the former NBA stars.  He is extremely close with Jordan, Charles Barkley, and co-worker Magic Johnson.  The day after “The Decision,” Wilbon intimated that many former players around the league were less than pleased with the move to Miami.  By now, most of us have read some of those thoughts as they have trickled out in public to the press.  Magic has disapproved.  Barkley has disapproved.  The chorus continued to sing.

Jordan’s first comments on the matter were made during an interview at the American Century Celebrity Golf tournament: “There’s no way, with hindsight, I would’ve ever called up Larry, called up Magic and said, ‘Hey, look, let’s get together and play on one team…But that’s … things are different. I can’t say that’s a bad thing. It’s an opportunity these kids have today. In all honesty, I was trying to beat those guys.”  Barkley followed up with: “Mike and I are in 100 percent agreement on this…If you’re the two-time defending NBA MVP, you don’t leave anywhere. They come to you. That’s ridiculous.”

But earlier this week, Michael Wilbon finally gave us a window into the level of anger and disdain that these titans of the game have for the move to Miami.  In an interview on ESPN 980 in Washington, PTI partner Tony Kornheiser started into a point with “Jordan was very critical of LeBron…” when Wilbon quickly interrupted with:

You don’t even know the half of it…Let me just say this now that he has gone public: The Jordan version that you see now where he is sort of smiling but saying, ‘I hate this’ –  that is one percent of the steam that was rising from Michael Jordan the night [The Decision] happened.  He has calmed down a bit.

It was a radio interview that passed quickly and did not get the same attention as Michael’s first comments.  Wilbon, however you may fault him for his involvement in the Decision show, is extremely close with these guys and has great insight into both their careers and post-career thoughts and commentaries on the league.  Wilbon tried to paint an objective argument for LeBron leaving – in the end, however, he agreed with the former superstars and relayed a few more thoughts he had heard from MJ:

I agree with Jordan that the league was built on rivalries.  If you love basketball, you want to see the best play against the best, not hook up.  If Bird and Magic had hooked up, where would we be?  Michael Jordan was a free agent and Pat Riley tried to get him in 1997 and Jordan said to him, to his face, ‘This is a great  honor you show me, but I want to kill you…and you want to kill me.’

I am with Jordan on this.  Magic feels the same way.  Earvin has not been as strident about it and Bird has not been as strident about it.  Barkley has.  And they are right.

The best people want to beat the best people.  When Isiah beat the Bulls three straight years, as Jordan said to me, did I want to go play with him the next year?  [Wilbon speaking as MJ] Three straight times in the playoffs [the Pistons] beat my brains in, the idea is to beat [Isiah].

This is not necessarily breaking new ground and it’s an unsurprising opinion but I had not heard this specific level of disappointment and anger coming from Jordan’s initial comments.  My ears certainly perked up while driving around DC on Monday (You can listen here in the July 26, part 2 archive at the 14:30 mark)

AP reporter Tom Withers said in interview on WKNR yesterday that he had heard rumblings that LeBron may issue some sort of message to Cleveland.  The booing of any mention of his name at the ESPYs supposedly was a wake up call for him.  I imagine the severity of the furor and disapproval from his basketball idol is a pretty big wake up call as well.

  • JM

    More I read about Maverick Carter more i think he is a complete moron who has no idea what he is doing. Good thing his buddy is keeping him around or he would be a nobody. That Vegas story is a joke but not a shock to me. This is what happens when LeQuit has his goons be his business team.

  • S-Devo

    take a look at this photoshopped picture of jordan bird and magic together

    http://www.weallscheme.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Larry-Bird-Magic-Johnson-Michael-Jordan-e1280189149284.jpg

  • ben

    Interesting to say the least.

    It really has become the world v. lebron everywhere but in miami

  • MattyFos

    That’s just turrible

  • MrCleaveland

    Wilbon’s disapproval is pretty selective. He has no problem with Jordan or Barkley criticizing The Global I-Con, but he had a big problem with Dan Gilbert doing so. Right after Jesse Jackson turned this into a race thing, Wilbon went all Militant Black Panther and excoriated Gilbert on PTI, agreeing with Jackson’s plantation/slave b.s.

    That disgusted me. I used to love PTI, but I haven’t watched it since.

  • MP34

    Not surprising. If you watched the MJ video from the golf tourney you can tell his mouth was saying “I can’t say that’s a bad thing” but the rest of his body told a different story.

    I’d also never heard about Jordan telling that to Riley. That is just pure awesome.

  • http://shakesthesnowglobe.blogspot.com EZ

    If the ESPYs booing was a wake-up call then it came too late, he overslept, and as a consequence failed the exam. I imagine any statement he makes to Cleveland at this point will be returned to him in the form of thunderous boos the first time he sets foot back in the Q.

  • http://www.twitter.com/jkadis Justin

    Doubtful it’s a wake-up call when he’s partying it up in Vegas…

  • MattyFos

    I think Dwayne Wade attacked #6 in his sleep and planted the Miami idea.

    /Inception

  • Stinkfist

    Oh Yay!! I hope LeBron’s message comes live via an ESPN special broadcast!

  • Rich

    Out of all the people you can possibly excuse in the whole decision thing, Wilbon is it. He was the only guy who wasn’t fawwning over LBJs every word and actually asked him a tough question or two.

  • swig

    Not to dwell on the last paragraph, but what’s the chance his announcement ends well…

    1% – he says something meaningful
    10% – it is simply hollow and empty
    89% – we get another flaming publicity train wreck

  • Jack

    @MattyFos – I just linked a dozen people to your comment. That was well-struck, sir. Well-struck.

  • Jack

    @MattyFos – BTW, instead of suits with guns, I’m imagining Dwyane having to play LBJ one-on-one to get the “vault” which happens to be a real vault in the basement of his mansion. An epic struggle against LBJ’s subconscious much like that kung-fu/anime inspired joint from a few years ago.

  • WayneEmbrysKids

    Ha! Wake up call? Has anyone read the ESPN article about what Lebron was doing in Vegas? That guy doesnt care about anything.

  • WayneEmbrysKids

    Didn’t see what Justin already posted, but no way Lebron James cares for one second about anything other than whether the woman serving him champaign is wearing panties.

  • Jason

    @Stinkfist – dang it! you beat me to the joke! Like Mike Tyson, I tip my hand to you, sir…

    I think Lebron’s statement to Cleveland will be something like this, “You were nothing before I arrived, and I hope one day you can appreciate how much I spoiled you with my play. Don’t hate”

  • http://waitingfornextyear.com Brendan

    I just read the LeBron in Vegas article…wow. Not a good portrait – cannot believe they granted that access. I see the link is no longer working now as well.

  • Mark

    If Lebron does make a statement to the Cleveland fans and he talks about some kind of “humbling” experience through the whole process I will hate him even more.

  • Adam in Mentor

    Anyone know where I can find a copy of the ESPN LeBron Vegas article? It seems to have been removed from the ESPN website… Shocking.

  • JK

    I have no idea what you guys are talking about LBJ in Vegas, somebody fill me in.

  • AcrossTheField

    Yeah what JK said… can someone link that E$PN article?

  • CLEFAN4LIFE

    Any statement Lebron makes is an insult. It will only be a PR move on his part. Lebron has shown time and time again that he only cares about Lebron. I love that guys like Magic and Jordan are speaking out.

  • Jason

    LBJ / Vegas article is nowhere to be found… can’t even find it in the google cache…

  • Adam in Mentor

    Here is a link to the ESPN story, which has magically become a blank page. Good to know ESPN’s head is still firmly placed between between Lebron’s legs…

    http://sports.espn.go.com/los-angeles/nba/columns/story?id=5416131

  • Stinkfist

    @Jason
    OMG E$PN OWNS GOOGLE TOO!!!!

  • MP34

    @Jason, no google cache? That’s crazy!

    Anyone know what the title to the story was?

  • MattyFos

    @Jack

    And as they were playing one-on-one for #6’s vault. #6 gave up and let Wade open it.

    /Game 5’d

  • 5KMD

    Now, if the general population will take this “superstars teaming up is bad” mentality to the MLB and the Yankees.

    Nope, nevermind.

  • mike

    the author of that story is Arash Markazi. the title is “Miami Heat star LeBron James shows his party side in Vegas”. the link is now dead.

  • Jason

    Lebron Article. Doesn’t paint a pretty picture, not surprised ESPN took it down.

    LeBron James leans against a waist-high stone wall with a 16-foot-tall Buddha hovering over him.
    He’s at Tao, a bustling restaurant and nightclub inside the Venetian hotel in Las Vegas, and his arms are crossed as he listens to Lynn Meritt, senior director of Nike Basketball, and Charles Denson, president of Nike Brand.James is quiet, occasionally applying Chap Stick on his lips and nodding when he hears something he likes.

    Five security guards are stationed around him, one at each corner of the table he’s about to sit at and another roving around with him, watching his every move. Anyone who takes two steps toward James is stopped and must have James’ approval to come closer.

    The waiter bringing him his cup of green tea with a spoonful of honey and a dash of lemon juice makes the cut, as does the scantily clad brunette with a tattoo of a heart on her right shoulder.

    She wants to take a picture with him. “I can’t right now,” says James. “Maybe later, upstairs, I’ll remember you’re the one with the tattoo.”

    James will host a party later in the upstairs nightclub at Tao, but he is currently hosting a dinner for his friends and family in the downstairs restaurant. Wearing a gray striped shirt and gold crucifix around his neck, he bobs his head to music played by an amped-up saxophonist who weaves his way around the table like a one-man mariachi band.

    I have somehow found myself at this exclusive table, seated beside Eddie Jackson, who is introduced to me as James’ father (though he actually began dating James’ mother, Gloria, after LeBron was born and the two are no longer together). Jackson, wearing a muscle shirt accentuating his large biceps, looks like a member of James’ four-man entourage, like one of his childhood friends.

    James’ circle includes Randy Mims, seated to his right at the center of the table, Maverick Carter, seated at the head of the table, and Richard Paul, seated in front of James. The quartet makes up the initials behind LRMR Marketing, the management firm James founded almost four years ago with his buddies. Their offices in downtown Cleveland gained notoriety this month as the location teams flocked to for their meetings with James.

    LeBron James partied at Tao last weekend, complete with a kings’ cake and an entourage to make heads of state jealous.

    Seated to the right of James is Chris Paul, whose brother, C.J., is seated across from him. The New Orleans Hornets point guard has seen how James has positioned himself to win a championship by signing with the Miami Heat and joining forces with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh and has reportedly considered a similar move himself.

    The truth is, in James’ dream world, the duo he would love to play with for the next decade would be Wade and Paul, his two closest friends in the NBA. Paul has been like a brother to James since the two were in Las Vegas four years ago for USA Basketball training camp, when as a rookie he carried James’ and Wade’s bags to and from the team bus.

    James and Paul are fairly quiet at the center of the table as they take in the scene around them. As family style plates of miso-glazed Chilean sea bass and crispy lobster and shrimp dumplings are brought to the table, James effortlessly picks up the food with his chopsticks and occasionally raises his cup of green tea to passersby as they raise their martinis and mojitos in his direction before being helped along by security guards.

    When trays of dessert plates are brought over, James gets up, preferring to start his party upstairs instead of indulging in the giant fortune cookies and chocolate cake. A security guard comes over and puts plastic wristbands on our wrists and escorts us through the back of the restaurant, up a flight of stairs in the bowels of the hotel and through a back entrance into the club. About a dozen security guards, moving their flash lights, direct us to a roped off section on the dance floor of Tao next to a couple of apparently nude women in a bathtub full of water and rose petals.

    James, now wearing sunglasses in the dark club, immediately stands up on the couch and folds his arms high on his chest and nods his head. He smiles as he looks at the dozens of people crowded on the dance floor. Noticing him, they stop dancing and snap pictures as the DJ screams out, “LeBron James in the building!” and plays ****’s “I’m in Miami.”

    Carter, LeBron’s childhood friend and manager, begins dancing around James like Puff Daddy in a Notorious B.I.G video. A giant red crown-shaped cake is brought over to James while go-go dancers dressed in skimpy red and black outfits raise four lettered placards that spell out, “KING.” Carter grabs a bottle of Grey Goose and pours a quarter of it on the floor and raises it up before passing it off.

    James’ infamous one-hour special, “The Decision,” was reportedly the brainchild of Carter, a 28-year-old who has never managed anyone outside of his friend James. This three-day party marathon in Vegas (which James is being paid six figures to host) is also Carter’s idea.

    Bottle after bottle of “Ace of Spades” champagne is delivered to the table by a waiter flying down from above the dance floor like some overgrown Peter Pan on a wire. One time he’s dressed like a King, another time as Indiana Jones and another in a replica of James’ No. 6 Miami Heat jersey.

    James, who can hardly see the flying figure through his tinted glasses, almost gets kicked in the head on the waiter’s last trip down. He looks at the girls around him and says, “I wish they’d have one of these girls with no panties do that instead of the guy.”

    Toward the end of the night, Boston Celtics forward Glen Davis walks past James’ party and looks at the scene up and down several times like a painting in a museum, soaking in the images of the go-go dancers, the “King” sign and the costumed man delivering bottles of champagne.

    Davis shakes his head and walks on.

    James dances on the couch and sings along with the music blaring from speakers all around him.

    The more you hang around James, the more you realize he’s still a child wrapped in a 6-foot-8, 250-pound frame. The night after the party at Tao, he and his crew walk through the casino at the Wynn and Encore and he pretends to dribble a basketball as he walks past ringing slot machines and tourists who do double-takes. In a Nike T-shirt, jeans and sneakers, James’ pantomime seems unconscious. He stops every few feet to shoot a jump shot, his right hand extended above his head on the follow through. He weaves through a pack of a dozen friends and pretends to connect on a layup as he walks past a gift shop. He passes overhead casino signs and jumps up and slaps them, pretending to dunk. Columns covered with advertisements for lounge acts become stationary defenders, chumps to fake out before connecting on imaginary mid-range jump shots.

    James probably goes through a practice’s worth of shots as we walk from the XS nightclub at Encore (James left his poolside table when he saw the club was practically empty), through Wynn and over the bridge to the Palazzo.

    Soon after arriving at Lavo, a restaurant and nightclub at the Palazzo, a scene straight out of “West Side Story” breaks out when James and Lamar Odom, seated at a nearby table, engage in an impromptu dance-off to California Swag District’s “Teach Me How To Dougie.”

    Odom, smoking a cigar, can’t quite keep up. James celebrates by crossing himself and taking a shot of Patron. Moments later, a handful of girls dressed as cheerleaders walk toward his table with someone dressed in James’ Heat uniform. Someone throws talcum powder in the air as James does before every game, while his new unofficial song, “I’m in Miami,” plays.

    Odom casts a glance James’ way before looking in the opposite direction and raising his glass at a couple on the dance floor who point to their ring fingers and smile.

    Back at his table, James and his crew sing every word to Rick Ross’ “Free Mason.” LeBron raps every line to former teammate Damon Jones (who played with him in Cleveland). Jones, puffing on a cigar, nods.

    James rips out the lines:

    “If I ever die, never let it be said I didn’t win/
    Never, never say/
    Never say legend didn’t go in/
    I just wanna die on top of the world.”

    While he looks at club-goers flashing the LA and Westside signs at him, James smiles and points to Jackson’s T-shirt, which reads, “Another Enemy,” and raises his glass of champagne.

    Finally, Carter tells James it’s time to leave the club and they do, LeBron pretending to cross-over tables and shoot over slot machines all the way back to his room.

  • mike

    here is that story, re-posted on a celtics blog, courtest of pat mcmanamon.

    http://forums.celticsblog.com/index.php?topic=40677.msg817938;topicseen

  • Adam in Mentor

    LeBron James leans against a waist-high stone wall with a 16-foot-tall Buddha hovering over him.
    He’s at Tao, a bustling restaurant and nightclub inside the Venetian hotel in Las Vegas, and his arms are crossed as he listens to Lynn Meritt, senior director of Nike Basketball, and Charles Denson, president of Nike Brand.James is quiet, occasionally applying Chap Stick on his lips and nodding when he hears something he likes.

    Five security guards are stationed around him, one at each corner of the table he’s about to sit at and another roving around with him, watching his every move. Anyone who takes two steps toward James is stopped and must have James’ approval to come closer.

    The waiter bringing him his cup of green tea with a spoonful of honey and a dash of lemon juice makes the cut, as does the scantily clad brunette with a tattoo of a heart on her right shoulder.

    She wants to take a picture with him. “I can’t right now,” says James. “Maybe later, upstairs, I’ll remember you’re the one with the tattoo.”

    James will host a party later in the upstairs nightclub at Tao, but he is currently hosting a dinner for his friends and family in the downstairs restaurant. Wearing a gray striped shirt and gold crucifix around his neck, he bobs his head to music played by an amped-up saxophonist who weaves his way around the table like a one-man mariachi band.

    I have somehow found myself at this exclusive table, seated beside Eddie Jackson, who is introduced to me as James’ father (though he actually began dating James’ mother, Gloria, after LeBron was born and the two are no longer together). Jackson, wearing a muscle shirt accentuating his large biceps, looks like a member of James’ four-man entourage, like one of his childhood friends.

    James’ circle includes Randy Mims, seated to his right at the center of the table, Maverick Carter, seated at the head of the table, and Richard Paul, seated in front of James. The quartet makes up the initials behind LRMR Marketing, the management firm James founded almost four years ago with his buddies. Their offices in downtown Cleveland gained notoriety this month as the location teams flocked to for their meetings with James.

    LeBron James partied at Tao last weekend, complete with a kings’ cake and an entourage to make heads of state jealous.

    Seated to the right of James is Chris Paul, whose brother, C.J., is seated across from him. The New Orleans Hornets point guard has seen how James has positioned himself to win a championship by signing with the Miami Heat and joining forces with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh and has reportedly considered a similar move himself.

    The truth is, in James’ dream world, the duo he would love to play with for the next decade would be Wade and Paul, his two closest friends in the NBA. Paul has been like a brother to James since the two were in Las Vegas four years ago for USA Basketball training camp, when as a rookie he carried James’ and Wade’s bags to and from the team bus.

    James and Paul are fairly quiet at the center of the table as they take in the scene around them. As family style plates of miso-glazed Chilean sea bass and crispy lobster and shrimp dumplings are brought to the table, James effortlessly picks up the food with his chopsticks and occasionally raises his cup of green tea to passersby as they raise their martinis and mojitos in his direction before being helped along by security guards.

    When trays of dessert plates are brought over, James gets up, preferring to start his party upstairs instead of indulging in the giant fortune cookies and chocolate cake. A security guard comes over and puts plastic wristbands on our wrists and escorts us through the back of the restaurant, up a flight of stairs in the bowels of the hotel and through a back entrance into the club. About a dozen security guards, moving their flash lights, direct us to a roped off section on the dance floor of Tao next to a couple of apparently nude women in a bathtub full of water and rose petals.

    James, now wearing sunglasses in the dark club, immediately stands up on the couch and folds his arms high on his chest and nods his head. He smiles as he looks at the dozens of people crowded on the dance floor. Noticing him, they stop dancing and snap pictures as the DJ screams out, “LeBron James in the building!” and plays ****’s “I’m in Miami.”

    Carter, LeBron’s childhood friend and manager, begins dancing around James like Puff Daddy in a Notorious B.I.G video. A giant red crown-shaped cake is brought over to James while go-go dancers dressed in skimpy red and black outfits raise four lettered placards that spell out, “KING.” Carter grabs a bottle of Grey Goose and pours a quarter of it on the floor and raises it up before passing it off.

    James’ infamous one-hour special, “The Decision,” was reportedly the brainchild of Carter, a 28-year-old who has never managed anyone outside of his friend James. This three-day party marathon in Vegas (which James is being paid six figures to host) is also Carter’s idea.

    Bottle after bottle of “Ace of Spades” champagne is delivered to the table by a waiter flying down from above the dance floor like some overgrown Peter Pan on a wire. One time he’s dressed like a King, another time as Indiana Jones and another in a replica of James’ No. 6 Miami Heat jersey.

    James, who can hardly see the flying figure through his tinted glasses, almost gets kicked in the head on the waiter’s last trip down. He looks at the girls around him and says, “I wish they’d have one of these girls with no panties do that instead of the guy.”

    Toward the end of the night, Boston Celtics forward Glen Davis walks past James’ party and looks at the scene up and down several times like a painting in a museum, soaking in the images of the go-go dancers, the “King” sign and the costumed man delivering bottles of champagne.

    Davis shakes his head and walks on.

    James dances on the couch and sings along with the music blaring from speakers all around him.

    The more you hang around James, the more you realize he’s still a child wrapped in a 6-foot-8, 250-pound frame. The night after the party at Tao, he and his crew walk through the casino at the Wynn and Encore and he pretends to dribble a basketball as he walks past ringing slot machines and tourists who do double-takes. In a Nike T-shirt, jeans and sneakers, James’ pantomime seems unconscious. He stops every few feet to shoot a jump shot, his right hand extended above his head on the follow through. He weaves through a pack of a dozen friends and pretends to connect on a layup as he walks past a gift shop. He passes overhead casino signs and jumps up and slaps them, pretending to dunk. Columns covered with advertisements for lounge acts become stationary defenders, chumps to fake out before connecting on imaginary mid-range jump shots.

    James probably goes through a practice’s worth of shots as we walk from the XS nightclub at Encore (James left his poolside table when he saw the club was practically empty), through Wynn and over the bridge to the Palazzo.

    Soon after arriving at Lavo, a restaurant and nightclub at the Palazzo, a scene straight out of “West Side Story” breaks out when James and Lamar Odom, seated at a nearby table, engage in an impromptu dance-off to California Swag District’s “Teach Me How To Dougie.”

    Odom, smoking a cigar, can’t quite keep up. James celebrates by crossing himself and taking a shot of Patron. Moments later, a handful of girls dressed as cheerleaders walk toward his table with someone dressed in James’ Heat uniform. Someone throws talcum powder in the air as James does before every game, while his new unofficial song, “I’m in Miami,” plays.

    Odom casts a glance James’ way before looking in the opposite direction and raising his glass at a couple on the dance floor who point to their ring fingers and smile.

    Back at his table, James and his crew sing every word to Rick Ross’ “Free Mason.” LeBron raps every line to former teammate Damon Jones (who played with him in Cleveland). Jones, puffing on a cigar, nods.

    James rips out the lines:

    “If I ever die, never let it be said I didn’t win/
    Never, never say/
    Never say legend didn’t go in/
    I just wanna die on top of the world.”

    While he looks at club-goers flashing the LA and Westside signs at him, James smiles and points to Jackson’s T-shirt, which reads, “Another Enemy,” and raises his glass of champagne.

    Finally, Carter tells James it’s time to leave the club and they do, LeBron pretending to cross-over tables and shoot over slot machines all the way back to his room.

  • JK

    If you guys are on twitter there are jpeg images of it floating around, @chrislittmann tweeted one and I think @WFNYScott re-tweeted it.

    I just read it and dont really see what’s so wrong with it.

  • http://www.60bpm.com/ Robbie

    @MrCleaveland — PTI is like a terrible train wreck to me. I have a hard time looking away. And… there isn’t much else available when I’m riding the bike after work.

    I can’t wait to witness “The Statement” to Cleveland fans.

  • http://shakesthesnowglobe.blogspot.com EZ

    I kind of think the hullabaloo about the Vegas article is needless piling-on after a series of poor decisions. Sure, it paints a much different picture than has been painted of him (in most of the media) for the last few years but we’re seriously going to criticize Lebron for that party we’re going to have to seriously revise our opinions of Wilt Chaimberlain and Magic Johnson.

  • Chris
  • Stinkfist

    Oh man, I’ve never been drunk and tried to juke people out, or jumped up and touched the top of a door frame, or rapped along to a song, or wished I could see a bit more of the cocktail waitress. Who does that? Seriously.
    It sounds like he acted like a normal 25 year old drunk guy acts. The difference is that he was getting paid 6 figures to do it in the biggest party city in the world as one of the best athletes in the world.
    Although, whn most people walk in to a party and enjoy being showered with attention, praise, and a giant personalized cake, its called a wedding reception

  • http://shakesthesnowglobe.blogspot.com EZ

    @stinkfist

    I call that Saturday.

  • Harv 21

    For 7 years his feces emits nary an odor until suddenly the big reveal: he’s just Pacman.

    Yeah, we’re all shocked – shocked!- at the immaturity and excess. First, The Decision. Then ESPN pinkies the wind and sends out the gonzo journalist-wannabe for a hatchet job. In a matter of months they will swing back to his on-court unselfishness, his ego sublimation to create the most beautiful balling ever, that he gave up his very home for sports history, yadda yadda. Let’s not take this stuff too seriously.

  • St. McDuck

    “LeBro” deserves this. Every little bit of it.
    I don’t know if he’ll ever realize what he did, but we know. We’ll always know. Always remember. And always boo.

  • MonkeyBreath

    For me its not about whether the party was within limits of decency or whatnot, after all it was Vegas and that sort of stuff happens every day. What bothers me about it is that HE marketed himself at the mature young guy, the caring father, etc. While the media did help cultivate some of this image he made money from it. And after cultivating an image of wholesomeness he ends ups just being another punk kid. Until this point he had an opportunity to transcend the modern athlete which appeared to be his goal, but instead he is just like the rest of them. Of course, that is his choice, for him to make for himself and not any of us to make for him. But by marketing himself he has opened himself up for judgment by the public. Even if that means having innocuous party stories blown of of perspective – he did it to himself.

  • P. Mack

    Jordan is a team owner now, and everything he says has to be considered from that biased point of view. As a team owner he can’t be happy with players banding together to decide where to play.

  • Scooter

    @Stinkfist

    do you think LeBum EVER made six figures? pretty sure you meant 7’s 8’s and 9’s…and according to the Knicks marketing agency, he coulda went for 10 figures with them!

    btw, relax, turn around and take my hand

  • JM

    Like a poster said already LeBoob says he’s so wise, mature, a loving father, 2 time MVP. He’s only hurting his own image. Will be fun to watch Miami fail this year.

  • Ike

    If you really can’t understand where Jordan is coming from, then admit to yourself that you have limited knowledge of the NBA. There are people saying Jordan is hypocritical because he had Pippen…the Bulls drafted Pippen!! There are people saying Barkley is hypocritical…Barkley left Philly after 9 seasons in 1992, a year in which Philly was 35-47, he was never MVP in Philly and went to Phoenix where he was the man (not 2nd fiddle) and where he eventually won his only MVP award. It’s just not a congruent comparison. There is no congruent comparison for the cowardice shown by Lebron because no reigning 2-time MVP has ever jumped ship to another team…to be a secondary option.

  • Stinkfist

    Scooter – The first paragraph was full of sarcasm. Glad you had your guard up, especially on this site (fyi, that was also sarcasm)
    And I WAS referring to the 6 figures he got for making appearances at the Vegas parties. Didn’t you read the article everyone was talking about?

  • lake show

    Jordan had Pippen(1 of 50 greatest ever) and Rodman! Magic had too much talent to even mention and the same thing with Bird! Since 84 only 7 teams have won Championships. I still cant figure out why LJames is being slaughtered. We all knew the Cavs were a joke. If I had the chance I would want to bolt for Miami too, duh!!!