April 18, 2014

Cleveland Browns Film Room: Game 11, What a catch

Like we did last year before it became fashionable, we’ll take a seat each week in our very own WFNY Browns film room and break down a little tape from the game, with a specific focus.  Do enjoy.

The Browns created 8 turnovers in a win over the Steelers. There are 100 things we could look at, but today I want to focus on just one play. Trent Richardson’s touchdown run was very nice, but we’ve looked at his runs a lot in the film room. Josh Gordon’s effort to get a first down was awesome, but it was all effort and not much to break down.

There was a pass to Ben Watson on a third and eight that went for twenty yards and a big first down in Pittsburgh territory. The drive ended in a field goal, which wouldn’t have happened without Watson’s catch. Let’s take a look.

Third and eight. Ben Watson is lined up as the TE on the right side of the line. Jordan Cameron is lined up in the wingback position behind Watson. Greg Little is the wide out on the same side at the top of the screen. Richardson is the lone back. The Steelers are going to send a backer, bringing 5 rushers on the play.

At the snap we see Ben Watson gets a free release off the line. Cameron is going to chip the DE before passing him off to Schwartz and heading to the flat. Little begins a vertical pattern with the CB giving him all kinds of cushion without help up top. Weeden is going to fake a hand-off to Richardson. (Which is kind of ridiculous in this situation.)

Here we see Cameron’s release to the flats. This is a big part of why the play is successful. Watson is about to make his break to the outside. He is being covered by an inside LB and a DB in this shot, but the defender on his outside facing the line of scrimmage is going to peel off to cover Cameron. Richardson is going to try to help pick up the blitz, but he doesn’t do a good job of that on this play.

Here’s the coaches film view. Little on the top of the screen is pushing vertical opening a space underneath. Watson is going to break to the outside with a LB in coverage. This is a great match-up for the Browns. Cameron is underneath pulling the extra defensive back away from the space Watson is running to. Gordon is running a come back route at the bottom of the screen, keeping the safety in the middle of the field.

There we see Watson’s break and the release of the ball. The timing here was very good, as Weeden is about to get popped by the blitzing LB.

The pass wasn’t good, but Watson was able to get to it.

It really was a great catch, and a well designed and executed play that worked great against the defense the Steelers had on.

As the internet would say- more of this please.

Until next week…

  • MrCleaveland

    1. Again on that play, Weeden threw it high and wide, and Watson bailed him out.

    2. FWIW, which might be nothing, I’ve noticed on a couple of occasions that Richardson has not always done a very good job picking up the pass rush.

    3. It’s amazing how often you see teams running play fakes when there’s no reason to and not running play fakes when there is a very good reason to. I guess coaches have other things to worry about. But it seems that smart ball-faking could give a team a little bit of an edge.

  • Jaker

    I can’t wait to play Oakland. TB lit them up and I think our O can produce the same type of performance against a bad D

  • jewpants47

    the play action is kinda dumb here on 3rd and 8, but i get it. You’ve only got 2 receivers wide, so the threat of a draw play would make sense to get Phil a little closer for FG. If the weak safety crashes down, it opens up a huge hole for Gordon running a deep in. And if the other CB makes a mistake, Weeden has an easy TD bomb to Little, 1 on 1.

  • http://twitter.com/GreatestHurley Jason Hurley

    That’s my big gripe with this team – you’ve got a back that can get yards, so play fake appropriately to open things up a little.

  • mgbode

    i stand by my assertion that Childress/Shurmur utilize the play-action on plays like these in order to force Weeden to not stare down his primary WR. it forces him to look away and go back to read where the defense is now.

    learning process type of thing IMO.

  • mgbode

    TB is among the most efficient offenses in the NFL. I do not think our offense can do what they can do.

  • thepaledragon

    Weeden does need to work on his touch, but I’m OK with high and wide there. In that scenario, throwing high and wide guarantees that there is no interception. Watson may not have caught it, but ONLY Watson could have caught it.