April 19, 2014

Scott Raab on Andy Samberg, The Freedom Tower, “cart-offs,” the Browns and Tribe – WFNY Podcast – 2013-08-19

WFNY Podcast LogoThis week, I’m going to save you the bullet points. Instead I’m going to share my pre-show email to Scott Raab (@ScottRaab64) with my ideas to discuss on the show. Doing this enabled me to stay in the podcast a bit more without typing notes as I went along. So here (with very few edits) is what I sent to Scott the night before we were ready to talk.

I enjoyed the Q&A with Andy Samberg. I just wanted to talk a little bit about how big he would have been in a different era with all his different talents around comedy. Just like we can’t have another Beatles because of the change in the music business, it’s increasingly difficult – even with the same TV show as a launching pad – for there to be another Bill Murray or even Sandler or Will Ferrell.

I enjoyed your Freedom Tower piece too. I wanted to discuss how anything 9/11-related is such a difficult “sell.” World Trade Center movies haven’t done particularly well. Kathryn Bigelow wins awards, but largely doesn’t blow anyone away with box office receipts. And here you are telling an important story about the political dynamics of what should be the most important part of the re-development at the WTC site, and I still get the feeling that nobody wants to talk about it. What is it? Is it a defense mechanism? Fatigue? Something else? Do the blustery politicians from your piece prefer it that way?

The importance of our developing language has never been more apparent than seeing the real legacy of the New Orleans Saints bounty scandal. Not new safety rules for the game, but the media’s incessant use of the term “cart-off” this pre-season. I don’t remember “cart-off” being used so much prior to the Saints scandal, but now I see it on NFL Network and ESPN TV scrolls for injured player news. Why would they adopt something that they spent an entire year painting as completely dastardly?

Indians have a stronger record this season, but it’s still a fade. Is a drastic record improvement over last year good enough, or is a year without playoffs a total waste? Are there shades of gray in this conversation?

Browns looked good, but Weeden still stares down his receivers. I’m heading to Indianapolis next week for the third pre-season game with my father-in-law, so let’s talk about domes. Are you an outdoor football traditionalist? I’m not, and like the tailgating conversation, when I talk about domes I get into trouble with a percentage of the hardcore Browns fanbase.

Check out this episode

  • WFNY_DP

    I’ve long wanted Mike Sarbaugh to be the hitting coach. I’m glad he’s on the staff (sooner or later he’s going to be a very good MLB manager), but he’s worked as a hitting coach in this system in the past, and his teams in the minors won titles by bludgeoning offense. He’s also, coincidentally, coaxed some of the best offensive seasons out of many of our young hitters that they’ve had at any levels of the minors.

    At some point, that would have to count for something, no?

  • mgbode

    unless he’s the Matt LaPorta of managers

    (ducking)

  • WFNY_DP

    I don’t think he is, to be honest (though it’s a valid concern, for sure). He’s managed at every level in the minors, and won five championships at ALL levels. He did it in Columbus two years in a row after having his rosters picked clean by the Tribe.

    I’m not saying he’s ready to manage the Tribe or anything. I just know from covering the Clippers for a few years that he has an extensive resume of coaching hitting as well as getting the most offensively out of a roster at all levels. I’d like to see if he can do it at the MLB level.

  • mgbode

    which is why he has earned the right to have a shot at MLB

  • Steve

    Tease out the Huntington Park effect, where Sarbaugh spent three years.

    http://www.milb.com/news/article.jsp?content_id=41998650&fext=.jsp&vkey=news_milb&ymd=20130225

  • swig

    This podcast was fantastic. I was a little sad when the conversation turned to sports.