April 19, 2014

Luck and Suck: FanGraphs digs in on two Tribe pitchers

Corey Kluber

Small sample sizes rarely stop the crew over at FanGraphs—if anything, they thrive on them, helping hardcore fans understand why a player hasn’t exactly done what has been expected of him, either for the better or worse. Given the small sample size discussion from our own Jon earlier this week, the latest from FanGraphs falls right in line, discussing the merits (or lackthereof) of the struggles being exhibited by two of Cleveland’s own: Corey Kluber and Carlos Carrasco.

In a post titled “Buy Low on Corey Kluber,” Scott Spratt echoes much of what Steiner said, focusing solely on the stoic one and his 5.50 ERA.

Kluber’s 8.64 strikeouts and 1.62 walks per nine innings are in line with his 8.31 and 2.02 rates from last year when he carried a 3.85 ERA for the season. In fact, Kluber’s 3.31 FIP is almost identical to his 3.30 FIP from 2013. It stands to reason that his ERA will fall in line if he continues to pitch this way.

Kluber is not unusual as a victim of the small-sample madness of the first few weeks of the new season. However, I do think circumstances have conspired to make him particularly vulnerable, and those circumstances have just improved.

To date, only the Minnesota Twins have been worse defensively in the outfield than the Indians based on the combined Defensive Runs Saved totals of the three outfield positions. The Indians have lost eight runs in the outfield, and almost all of it has been the result of Nyjer Morgan and Michael Brantley in center field.

Spratt, in addition to luck and a .411 BABiP, believes that the addition of Michael Bourn alone should allow for the fly-ball happy Kluber to regain his relative success. While it seemed crazy a few days ago, the fact that Morgan has been tagged with a league-worst five runs to this point speaks volumes to his demotion. While the article doesn’t mention the loss of Drew Stubbs as well, it does appear that if Bourn can provide at least baseline levels of defense, the team will be that much more better off—regardless of what he does at the plate.

Regarding Carrasco, things appear to be a bit less luck-based and more, well, Carrasco-based.

It’s easy to point to his 3.51 SIERA, ridiculous .400 BABIP and 53.8% LOB% and claim he’ll enjoy better luck moving forward. Similarly, it’s also simple to call him a head case, perform no analysis whatsoever, and move on. But of course, I’m not going to do either of these things. With a repertoire that seemingly appears fantastic, why isn’t Carrasco the best pitcher in baseball?

The odd thing about the inflated BABIP is that he has a allowed an LD% of just 12.9%. Given that line drives go for hits most frequently of all the batted ball types, it’s a surprise that he has allowed so many hits when the majority of his balls in play are ground balls. [...]

Although Carrasco’s fastball sits in the mid-90s and has touched as high as 96.7 mph this year and 98.1 mph historically, the pitch has been clobbered. He throws both a four-seamer and a two-seamer and both have been absolutely wretched. This year, the four-seamer, which he throws most often, has been hit to the tune of a .381 wOBA. While that’s terrible, that’s nothing compared to what hitters have done to his poor two-seamer.

Batters have quite enjoyed Carrasco’s two-seam fastball. How much you ask? Oh, just a delightful .761 wOBA. That’s not OPS, that’s wOBA. In OPS terms, it’s 1.811, including a .444 ISO and .667 batting average. Yeeesh. When you’re fastballs are that bad and you throw them a combined 60% of the time, no wonder why you’re getting blasted.

Fans have always loved Carrasco’s live arm—players who can get the ball up in the 90s are just fun to watch. That said, it’s intriguing that the best pitch for guy who can nearly hit triple-digits is actually his change-up. Carrasco simply can’t locate his heat. He touches 95 on the regular, but any major league baseball player can hit that when it’s served up over the middle of the plate, as Carlos has been thus far. Whether or not Mickey Callaway can coach Carrasco—and whether or not the pitcher can be coached—will be one huge storyline heading into May, especially with Trevor Bauer tossing yet another gem on Wednesday night1.

(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

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Footnotes:

  1. Six innings, no runs on five hits, striking out nine batters with just one walk. []

Tribe Weekend Recap: Masterson’s ill-timed stinker, the Carrasco conundrum, Asdrubal’s impatience, and roster decisions

Jason Kipnis

The Cleveland Indians took two of three from the San Diego Padres and headed to Chicago for a four-game set with the team they owned last year, the White Sox. A 17-2 season-series was never going to happen again, especially with the off-season improvements the South Siders have made. We saw a lot of that this weekend with Adam Eaton and Jose Abreu looking like potential thorns in the side of the Indians for years to come.

After losing the first two, the Tribe took a see-saw affair Saturday 12-6 and looked to leave Chicago with a split Sunday. Corey Kluber gave the Indians a solid performance, but was touched up for an eighth inning solo homer to Marcus Semien which broke a 1-1 tie. But this Tribe team doesn’t quit. They came right back to get two off of closer Matt Lindstrom with the key hit by the hot-hitting David Murphy. But you have to get 27 outs to win a game, and the Tribe couldn’t close. [Read more...]

Trevor Bauer could be in line for first start of 2014

bauer acab

With Monday’s game against the San Diego Padres washed out by Mother Nature, Tribe pitching prospect Trevor Bauer could be in line for his first start of 2014 when the two teams lock up in a traditional double-header on Wednesday. Zach McAllister (who wound up with a no-decision last week) is scheduled to start one of the games of the doubleheader, with the Indians expected to promote a pitcher from Columbus to start the other. Bauer, who fresh off of a two-hit gem late last week, would be in line to take the bump.

In his debut for the Clippers, the heady Bauer frequently saw his fastball settle in around 95 miles-per-hour, fanning nine and walking just two in six innings of work. The kid’s struggles are well-documented, but at just 23 years old, things may finally be clicking for the former highly touted prospect.

The Indians could certainly use some clarity at the bottom of the rotation as Carlos Carrasco was anything but solid in his 2014 debut this past weekend. Similarly, Josh Tomlin had a debut to forget, allowing five hits and four earned runs (walking three) in just six innings in a loss to Indianapolis.

Tribe Weekend Recap: Opening day fun, starting pitching concerns, Vinnie’s future, and Wahoo

Jason Kipnis

If I told you the Tribe would lose two of three in Oakland to start the year and then come home to take two of three from Minnesota, I am sure many of you would have taken it. Though the opposite actually happened, the record is still the same: 3-3. The weekend series with the Twins should have turned out differently, but we witnessed lots of sloppy play and even sloppier pitching, particular from the starters. Opening Day was a success on the field once the bad weather passed. Saturday and Sunday, however, left a lot to be desired.

It is easy to jump to early conclusions. That would be irresponsible as an Indians fan. Do not forget that this was just one week; six games to be exact. There are 156 games left to be played. Things will get better, things will get worse, but one thing is for certain: A season is not shaped by April 6.

As we have done for WFNY each of the past four seasons, Monday mornings at 10 a.m. will be a look back at the good and the bad of the Tribe’s weekend series. This particular one had plenty to discuss. [Read more...]

Carlos Carrasco wins the fifth starter job; Josh Tomlin sent to Columbus

Carlos Carrasco

The Horseshoe Casino be on Ontario and Prospect, but they’re rolling the dice two blocks south. In addition to Carlos Santana being named the Cleveland Indians’ Opening Day third baseman, per multiple reports, Carlos Carrasco has won the fifth starter job.

While it may appear that it’s a great week for Carlos’, it could be argued that both men landed in their positions more out of necessity. While Lonnie Chisenhall made the 25-man roster, his role will be more versatile this season, splitting time between third base, designated hitter and sporadic pinch-hitting roles—all predominantly when a right-handed pitcher is on the mound. In Carrasco’s situation, the flame-throwing hot head is out of options while Josh Tomlin (who was optioned to Triple-A Columbus) is not. Rather than Tomlin being handed the fifth starter role (after a solid Spring Training) and crow-barring Carrasco into the bullpen at the expense of a more-worthy arm, the Indians took the business route that will allow for flexibility at a future point if the 26-year-old can’t figure things out.1

Carrasco finished the spring with an ERA north of 5.00 but did manage to strike out 16 (while walking just three) in 15 2/3 innings. He can miss bats with the best of them, but it’s the mental state that has gotten the best of him. Tribe fans should get their first glance at Carrasco when the team hosts the Twins next weekend. Let’s hope it’s a prolonged one.

(Image: Chuck Crow/The Plain Dealer)

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Footnotes:

  1. They’re widely expected to carry eight bullpen arms, meaning that both Scott Atchison and Blake Wood will make the final cut. []

Raburn Rocking, Bauer Rocked: Tuesday Tribe Notes

Josh TomlinWe are now two weeks into the game portion of Spring Training, so it is time to take stock of what we have learned thus far. There are plenty of intriguing battles going on. Some players have made statements, while others are still trying to make up ground. I have kept my ear to the ground and as always, I’ve tried to stay on top of all the goings-on in Goodyear. With just 20 days until the opener in Oakland, I file this report….

While Raburn sizzles, Murphy isn’t ready. Of all of the pleasant surprises of the 2013 playoff season, perhaps none was bigger than the renaissance of Ryan Raburn. A big reason that the former Tiger was so good was the genius of manager Terry Francona. Tito played Raburn perfectly; he didn’t overuse him, picking and choosing his spots, yet he knew when to ride him when he was sizzling. Midway through the season, Raburn smartly signed a two-year extension with the Tribe for $4.75 million. Knowing Ryan is at his best in the role he played last season, GM Chris Antonetti signed David Murphy from Texas to a two-year deal. The rightfield platoon was all set. [Read more...]

The Tribe’s future rests with the development of Salazar, Carrasco and Bauer

 Untitled

If you build them, wins will come

I truly despise using the old “in our market” excuse. It is the single worst thing about the game I love the most, Major League Baseball. We all know that the sport is completely unbalanced—the Yankees, Red Sox, and Dodgers can do whatever they want thanks to rich local TV contracts while our Cleveland Indians have to watch every penny. Chris Antonetti’s job is that much harder because he can’t afford to swing and miss on medium-money free agents. On top of that, the drafting and developing of young players is paramount to the success of the organization.

[Read more...]

How badly do the Indians need more starters? – Cleveland Indians Roundtable

WFNY_roundtable

Craig: Maybe I’m blinded by optimism, but I’m not overly concerned with a pitcher. The Indians have Masterson, Salazar, Kluber, McAllister and guys like Tomlin, Carrasco and Bauer to find five guys today. Yes it would be nice to insert a name in that list somewhere, but I’m not feeling desperate just yet. Look at me being a Tribe optimist!

Am I taking those top three for granted and overrating the Tribe’s own guys? How anxious are the rest of you to add starting pitching versus other roster needs?

Scott: Ubaldo Jimenez and Scot Kazmir were worth just a little less than six wins between the two of them. In just 10 starts, Danny Salazar was worth 1.2; Corey Kluber was worth 2.7 in 26 starts. Extrapolating is a dangerous tactic, but it wouldn’t be far-fetched to assume that these two could help fill in the gaps that were left by pesky things like innings limits and injuries. [Read more...]

Chris Antonetti talks Indians offseason on Sirius XM

Cleveland Indians general manager Chris Antonetti was on Sirius XM earlier this afternoon to talk about the team’s upcoming offseason.

You can listen for yourself on this SiriusXM link for a 3.5-minute portion of the entire interview. Per Twitter, other topics mentioned: Asdrubal Cabrera’s offseason training regimen, Trevor Bauer’s rocky 2013 and Danny Salazar’s unrestricted 2014.

From the available 3.5-minute comments, here’s a paraphrased transcription.

On Ubaldo Jimenez…
Antonetti said he’s not certain if he’ll be back next year, but the team “would be thrilled if he accepts the qualifying offer.” Gave credit to Jimenez and pitching coach Mickey Callaway for the pitcher’s impressive 2013 season.

On starting pitching depth…
Named off, perhaps surprisingly, Carlos Carrasco and Josh Tomlin as options for next season. Said the team feels good about its depth, but would obviously love Jimenez back.

On other offseason needs…
“We’ve lost a lot in our bullpen,” he said, mentioning released Chris Perez plus free agents Joe Smith, Matt Albers and Rich Hill. Expects the team will add a couple of pieces to the bullpen. And the team will be trying to find another “complementary bat.”

On the offense…
“We’re in a fortunate position going into the offseason in that we basically are returning an entire position player team that was fourth in the American League and fifth in baseball in runs scored.” Discussed the offense’s versatility.

On that “complementary bat”…
Antonetti said, in an ideal world, this would be a left-handed hitter. He rattled off outfield, first base, designated hitter and third base, in order, as potential positions of need for this player.

[Related: The Diff: Indians offseason, 2014 salary and contention windows]

2013 Indians In Review: The Starting Rotation

Corey Kluber

The Indians wild ride has come to an end. The 2013 season was one that nobody expected. A 96 loss team turned into a 92 win club that advanced to the playoffs for the first time since 2007. GM Chris Antonetti and Manager Terry Francona helped changed the culture of the organization and has our baseball team on the rise. There is a buzz in the city about the Indians again. It was a season to remember with so many great moments and the arrival of some new fan favorites.  

Each day this week, we will look back at a different portion of the club and see where we are today, a plan for 2014, and so on. We will begin with the starting rotation, a group that was a huge surprise in 2013.  [Read more...]

Starting rotation an unsolved long-term mystery for Indians

ubaldo twinsWhat a season for Cleveland Indians starters. After posting the American League’s 13th best staff ERA back in 2012, the Tribe turned it around magically this year en route to the playoffs, jumping all the way to the AL’s sixth best ERA.

Not many could have predicted that success, probably not even much-applauded pitching coach Mickey Callaway. Yet, after the team’s season ended abruptly last week, it’s worth noting that the composition of the 2014 rotation is now up in the air.

There are two likely-to-be high-priced free agents, one impending free agent after next year and a collection of still-yet-unproven youngsters and inexperienced veterans. Who will step up? What will the rotation look like? What moves are necessary?

Heading into 2013, it was assumed that the Indians would pick up a starter on the free agent market. They did so in the form of $7 million for Brett Myers, but that proved to be a disaster: Myers actually managed to have a -0.6 WAR in just 21.1 innings pitched.

With the below list, I count five likely starters for the Tribe as they begin the season: Masterson, Jimenez/Kazmir, Salazar, Kluber and McAllister. That would be maintaining the same list as this season, provided they can re-sign one of the two free agents.

But Trevor Bauer has to get consistent MLB duty at some point. What will the long-term status be of Carlos Carrasco or Josh Tomlin? Is there anyone else in the minors? And is it actually plausible for the team to re-sign just one of the two free agents? Let’s go name by name.

 

Justin Masterson
Turns 29 in March
Made $5.69 mil in 2013; likely to be $8-10 mil for 2014
Free agent eligibility after 2014 season

The de facto team ace is likely to return to starting duties for 2014. He had success out of the bullpen down the stretch, but that was due to his return from injury. The biggest long-term question mark is whether the Indians will be able to afford him past next year. He’s set to make a nice raise through arbitration.

Ubaldo Jimenez
Turns 30 in January
Made $5.75 mil in 2013; likely to receive $10+ mil offer
Free agent eligibility after 2013 season

Jimenez (finally) pitched like an ace over the last few months of the season. That will only make him more difficult to keep in a Tribe uniform. Some will say Jimenez owes the Indians front office for turning his career around, but unfortunately, that’s not how the open markets operate. Assuming he wants it, he’ll get at least four years and $50 million elsewhere.

Scott Kazmir
Turns 30 in January
Made league min. in 2013; likely to receive $6-8 mil offer
Free agent eligibility after 2013 season

The more affordable free agent option for the Indians would be Kazmir. He was a reclamation project this season, signing a deal just to join for spring training before making 29 starts and striking out 162. He’s not an ace, but a guy most organizations would love to have as a strikeout-prone lefty. My guess: $15 million over two years to stay in Cleveland.

Corey Kluber
Turns 28 in April
Continues to make min. salary
Arbitration eligibility after 2015 season; free agent after 2018

As we discussed in Friday’s roundtable, the development of these next two starters are key for 2014. Kluber was a big surprise this season, jumping into the rotation and dominating for three months. But an August injury set him back to end the year. Indians have to hope he can recover that success and stay in the rotation.

Zach McAllister
Turns 26 in December
Continues to make min. salary
Arbitration eligibility after 2015 season; free agent after 2018

Two full seasons, 46 starts, ERA of 3.99. Another impressive yet relatively inexperienced starter, McAllister also wasn’t great down the stretch. He wasn’t the same pitcher after a six-week injury absence in June and July. He seems to be a fairly reliable No. 4 or No. 5 starter, but won’t be a huge difference marker.

Danny Salazar
Turns 24 in January
Continues to make min. salary
Arbitration eligibility after 2015 season; free agent after 2018

The up-and-coming Salazar supplanted the guy below as the team’s best pitching prospect. He went from Double-A prospect to playoff game starter in one season, just like 1997’s Jaret Wright. Hopefully Salazar’s next few years are brighter however, thanks to the Indians’ watchful eye throughout the season. No questions asked, just let him go full throttle now.

Trevor Bauer
Turns 23 in January
Continues to make min. salary
Arbitration eligibility after 2015 season; free agent after 2018

Remember this guy? The perhaps too-eccentric-or-maybe-ground-breaking prospect? He had a 5.29 ERA in four Cleveland starts and a disappointing 4.15 ERA in 22 starts for Columbus. The statistics are brutal: 73 walks, 106 strikeouts and 119 hits in 121.1 innings pitched. Those are Triple-A No. 5 starter stats. I’d assume he stays in Columbus to start 2014. He’s not ready yet.

Carlos Carrasco
Turns 27 in March
Made $0.5 mil in 2013; likely to be $1 mil for 2014
Free agent eligibility after 2016 season

All the evidence you need: 9.00 ERA in seven starts, 1.32 ERA in eight relief appearances. With the likely departure of Joe Smith out of the pen, Carrasco can slip into a long-term long-relief role and perhaps some sixth-inning duties. That will keep his cost low and perhaps harness his innate strikeout ability.

Josh Tomlin
Turns 29 in October
Made $0.5 mil in 2013; likely to be $1 mil for 2014
Free agent eligibility after 2016 season

The Little Cowboy appeared in only one Cleveland game this season as he recovered from August 2012 Tommy John surgery. He’ll have the offseason to fully recover, potentially returning into a bullpen role as well. It’s also possible that he doesn’t return to Cleveland, considering the lack of available innings.

 

Conclusion: So there you go, nine possible starters and a whole lot of questions still yet unanswered. I’m sure there will be more discussions on available free agent starters over the coming months, just like we had last season. Almost all of these players have had long-ish periods of major league success. Now it’s just a matter of money and composition as 2014 preparation begins soon.

As I shared earlier in the week, my optimism isn’t high. Jimenez’s emergence was a key reason for Cleveland clinching a playoff spot; my odds are probably 75-80% that he’s elsewhere next season. Kazmir would be a nice returning candidate, but who knows how much his value is right now. Then, Masterson’s upcoming availability also casts into doubt how much the Indians are willing to break the bank.

In the end, Bauer and Salazar have to develop as future leaders of a rotation. If that can happen, which certainly is a possibility, then the Indians are in much better shape with a back-end led by Kluber and McAllister. But the young guys could need to step up soon.

AP Photo/Ann Heisenfel

Tribe to add 10 players in upcoming days; Designate 2 for assignment

With the September 1st roster expansion tomorrow, the Indians will use that opportunity to add a significant number of pitchers to their staff. Manager Terry Francona announced the schedule of player additions this afternoon, per Paul Hoynes.

From the left side, they’ll add Nick Hagadone and Clay Rapada. From the right side, Vinnie Pestano, Preston Guilmet, C.C. Lee, Carlos Carrasco, Josh Tomlin, and Blake Wood. Newly-signed catcher Kelly Shoppach and infield prospect Jose Ramirez will be added to get the team up to 15 hitters following the additions of Jason Kubel and Matt Carson this week.

Guilmet, Hagadone, Wood, Shoppach and Ramirez will arrive Sunday. Rapada will arrive Monday with Pestano, Lee, Tomlin and Carrasco arriving Tuesday.

The pitching staff will be 20 strong, which is needed given the short pitch counts for both starter Danny Salazar and the soon-to-be-returning Corey Kluber, who could pitch as soon as Friday. Ramirez is the only one of the group without prior major league experience, and Pestano, Lee, Hagadone, Guilmet, and Carrasco have all been with the team at some point this season while Tomlin was on the major league 60-day disabled list.

To make room for Shoppach and Ramirez, the team designated outfielder Tim Fedroff and infielder Juan Diaz for assignment. Both spent the year at Triple-A Columbus. Diaz played in five games with Cleveland last season, but he was hitting just .242/.317/.348 this year with 45 RBI. Fedroff was also hitting .242 with 48 RBI and 22 stolen bases.

Related: Kubel deal is low risk, but likely low in reward

MLB News: Indians add OF Jason Kubel to MLB roster, Carrasco sent down

The Indians announced today that newly acquired outfielder Jason Kubel has been added to the team’s 25 man roster, taking the place of left hander Carlos Carrasco who has been sent down to AAA Columbus.

“The Cleveland Indians today announced the following roster moves relative to the Major League roster:

Added OF JASON KUBEL (#12) to the Major League roster

Optioned RHP CARLOS CARRASCO to the AAA Columbus Clippers

Kubel, 31, was acquired yesterday from the Arizona Diamondbacks and reported to Detroit last night

Carlos Carrasco tossed 1.1 scoreless innings last night and for the year has now tossed 10.1 scoreless relief innings pitched.  He is eligible to return to the Major League roster on September 3rd.”

Kubel’s arrival from Arizona comes at a time when the Indians are desperate for hitting. The Tribe have scored just eight runs in their last five games and are watching their season slip away from them. However, Kubel has struggled this season hitting just .220/.288/.324 with five home runs and 32 RBIs in 89 games while battling leg injuries. The Indians are taking a flyer on Kubel in hope he returns anywhere near the form he showed in 2012, hitting 30 home runs and driving in 90 runs.

Carrasco did not allow a run in 10 and 1/3 innings since moving to the bullpen and will most likely be back up in Cleveland when the rosters expand in September.

[Related: Kubel deal is low in risk, but likely low in reward: Tribe Talk]

Indians 4, Angels 1: What were you doing at 3:25 a.m?

Drew Stubbs

Raise your hand if you made it all the way 3:25 a.m. to see the finish of an epic battle between two teams who, to quote my high school basketball coach Max Vermilion, “couldn’t score in a whorehouse with a fistful of $20s?” I tried the best I could, but I succumbed to the sleep Gods just after 1 a.m. I was woken up by my daughter not once, but twice in the one and two-o’clock hours. Both times I looked at my Ipad to see if the Indians had won. Both times, the game was still going on. I give you friends of the feather who made it through until the end a standing ovation. You may be able to apply for some hazard pay as well.

I love this team about as much as anyone you will find, but the offense has been enough to put you to sleep, especially when they are in one of their cold streaks, as they are right now. Yet somehow, some way, they fight and keep fighting until their last out and make you proud.  [Read more...]

Indians 9 Twins 8: Monster comeback saves the series

Jason GiambiIf ever there was a time for a big time comeback win, this was it.

Trailing 7-3 heading into the eighth inning on a beautiful, sun-splashed day in downtown Minneapolis, your Cleveland Indians seemed like a team staring a series loss to an inferior opponent right in the face. But as we have seen so many times this season, just when you are ready to write these guys off, they respond in a huge way.

The Twins reliever Jared Burton gave way to Casey Fien. As usual Jason Kipnis was right in the middle of the action, beating out a leadoff infield single. Carlos Santana then sent a ground ball towards first baseman Justin Morneau, but the former AL MVP booted it. Kipnis ended up on third base. Mr. Clutch Michael Brantley naturally singled home Kipnis, bringing the tying run to the plate. It was the second RBI hit for Brantley to this point. Jason Giambi was next.

For all of the hand-wringing over his continued place on this roster, Giambi always seems to save his biggest hits for the most opportune times. The grizzled vet delivered the shot of the day, a three-run, game-tying homer to right field which stunned the Target Field faithful and energized the visiting Wahoos. [Read more...]

MLB News: Terry Francona says Scott Kazmir needs rest

The Indians have lost five games in a row, and lost starting pitcher Corey Kluber to a strained finger earlier this week. Now, it seems that starter Scott Kazmir may miss his next turn as well.

“He wanted to answer the bell today because he knew it was important,” Francona said of Kazmir. “But I think we’ll go back and see what we can do to try to give him maybe a couple [extra] days this time through. I think it’ll be good for him. I don’t think any of us thought he would go through the whole year and go every five days. I don’t think that was realistic.” [Bastian/MLB.com]

Kazmir started Friday night’s game against the Angels, but only went three innings after giving up five runs in the first. Carlos Carrasco pitched five strong innings in relief. He could be in line to take Kazmir’s next start if indeed he gets the extra rest that Francona is talking about.

Kazmir gave up more earned runs Friday than in his last four starts combined. After an excellent month of July, Kazmir is 7-5 on the season with a 4.18 ERA in 21 starts. He went 2-0 in July with a 2.75 ERA in six starts.

Carrasco is 0-4 with a 7.75 ERA in seven appearances in Cleveland. In Columbus, Carrasco is 3-1 with a 3.14 ERA in 71.2 innings pitched. He struck out 79 while walking 21 for the Clippers.

[Related: Indians reveal Kluber out 4 to 6 weeks]

MLB News: Indians recall P Carlos Carrasco; option Preston Guilmet to Columbus

The Indians today announced that RHP Carlos Carrasco has been recalled from AAA Columbus. He will take the roster spot of Preston Guilmet, who was brought up to bolster the bullpen yesterday.

What is particularly interesting is that the Indians plan to use Carrasco out of the bullpen.

“Carrasco begins his fourth stint at the Major League level in 2013, posting an 0-4 record with a 9.10ERA in 6 previous starts with Cleveland (28.2IP, 47H, 29ER, 13BB, 15K). Around his tenure with the Indians he has gone 3-1-1 with a 3.14ERA in 16 games/14 starts for Triple-A Columbus (71.2IP, 59H, 25ER, 21BB, 79K, .221 AVG, 9.9K per 9.0IP). Carlos is slated to pitch out of the bullpen and will be in uniform tonight when the Indians take on the Angels at 7:05 PM ET in Progressive Field.”

The bullpen has been overworked the last two games, pitching 5.2 innings yesterday (not counting Raburn’s inning of work) and 6.2 innings on Wednesday.

[Related: Tigers put a nail in division race coffin]

Chris Perez, the Alex Mack contract extension and farewell to D’Qwell Jackson? – WFNY Podcast – 2013-08-07

WFNY Podcast LogoOn Mondays I talk to Scott Raab, but I don’t talk to WFNY’s own Scott nearly often enough. We found some time to do it up podcast style. We discussed Chris Perez, and the Browns’ salary cap situation.

  • Ariel Helwani and his awesome video blog show setup
  • Jamison Hensley’s video from Berea was an embarrassment
  • Chris Perez and his meltdown against Detroit
  • Scott Sargent is in the bag for Chris Perez
  • Chris Perez loses games in big big spots
  • Mariano Rivera and Craig Kimbrel
  • Carlos Carrasco, Danny Salazar and Fausto Carmona as failed closers
  • Craig thinks Jonathan Papelbon is good looking
  • Chris Perez not talking to the media last night
  • Did Perez let his teammates down by not talking?
  • Francona has a history of taking up for his guys
  • The Perez marijuana case and how that’s impacting fans
  • Perez’ bed and how he made it
  • Not wearing the scarlet letter and also not condoning bad fan behavior
  • Alex Mack and his extension… where is it?
  • You would take Alex Mack over Mark Sanchez 100 times out of 100
  • How hard would it be to replace Alex Mack?
  • Browns extending Christian Yount for five years
  • Are the Browns thinking about extending Joe Haden?
  • Could this be the last season for D’Qwell Jackson in Cleveland? [Read more...]

Pluto: Discussing Internal Bullpen Options For The Second Half

In his weekly Sunday morning column, The Plain Dealer’s Terry Pluto talked about some options internally for the Indians troubled bullpen in the second half from both sides.

The Indians are looking at Clay Rapada (1-0, 2.78) at Columbus as a possible reliever. He was 3-0 with a 2.82 ERA in the majors last season with the Yankees. He’s a side-arming lefty who has been effective against left hitters, but has major problems with righty bats.

This is my idea: Carlos Carrasco to the bullpen, rather than Danny Salazar. Former Tribe GM John Hart used to put hard-throwers who struggled as starters into the bullpen, and it often worked with Jose Mesa, Eric Plunk, Steve Karsay and Danys Baez.

The Indians’ trouble from the left-side in the bullpen is well-chronicled with Rich Hill being the lone survivor from the revolving door of Scott Barnes, Nick Hagadone, and David Huff. Rapada in his career has held lefties to a .168 average (.493 OPS), allowing 26 walks and 69 strikeouts.

It’s a common practice to bring young pitching prospects out of the bullpen for a stretch postseason run. Salazar would fit that mold, but Carrasco certainly could as well. Carrasco has great stuff and throws hard, but his results have been awful at the big league level this season (0-4, 9.10 ERA in 6 starts, 47 hits, 13 BB, 15 K in 28 2/3 IP). Carrasco has allowed nearly the same amount of hits in twice as many innings at Columbus (3-0, 2.97 ERA, 49 hits, 19 BB, 71 K in 60 2/3 IP). At 26 years old, it is getting close to make or break time for the former Top 100 prospect. Salazar is 5-5 with a 3.04 ERA between Akron and Columbus this season and pitched a six-inning, one-run gem in his Major League debut earlier this month.

Related: What To Make Of Chris Antonetti’s Recent Comments

WFNY Stats & Info: Red-hot Indians pitching staff

Despite the win-loss struggles of this past road trip, the Cleveland Indians pitching staff has been on an impressive roll over the past few weeks. In the last 14 games since Carlos Carrasco’s last start on July 6th, they’ve been as good as they’ve ever been in two seasons.

Over those contests, the Indians have held opponents to just 38 runs total (2.7 per game). That’s a new season-best for any 14-game stretch in 2013. Here are the best 14-game pitching stretches of the year:

1st place: 7/7-7/24 — 38 runs (8-6 record)
T-2nd place: 4/24-5/9 — 41 runs (10-4 record)
T-2nd place: 4/22-5/8 — 41 runs (10-4 record)
T-4th place: 4/29-5/13 — 42 runs (12-2 record)
T-4th place: 4/21-5/7 — 42 runs (10-4 record)
6th place: 6/11-6/26 — 44 runs (10-4 record)

Obviously, many other teams have had far better 14-game stretches this season. The Atlanta Braves have the best mark in 2013, per Baseball-Reference.com, in allowing just 26 runs in a streak starting with their second game of the year.

But as a testament to the vast improvement of the 2013 Indians pitching staff, the best 14-game stretch in 2012 allowed 47 runs (3.4 per game).

Now, let’s take a look at the main reasons behind this improvement. Scott Kazmir delivered another outstanding performance on Wednesday. But how about the rest of the starters?

Last 14 games: 2.00 ERA, 6.0 IP/start, 8.9 K/9, 3.8 BB/9, .182/.270/.281 line
First 87 games: 4.62 ERA, 5.2 IP/start, 8.0 K/9, 3.5 BB/9, .262/.335/.427 line

The starters have clearly been much better all around, going longer into games and being more efficient. They might be walking a tad bit more batters, but they’re limiting anything offensively. So how about the much-maligned bullpen? Is there a difference in their recent performance?

Last 14 games: 3.11 ERA, 2.2 IP/game, 8.4 K/9, 4.3 BB/9, .260/.349/.329 line
First 87 games: 4.13 ERA, 3.0 IP/game, 8.9 K/9, 4.0 BB/9, .235/.321/.399 line

In the ERA column, the bullpen has been better, but they’ve been noticeably worse in terms of average and on-base percentage allowed. The huge decrease in slugging also is interesting. Chris Perez (0.82 ERA since return from DL) has been on fire of late, leading this charge.

The opponents over this 14-game stretch haven’t featured that excellent of offenses: Detroit, Toronto, Kansas City, Minnesota and Seattle. The Indians will have a tough task ahead this weekend against the Texas Rangers. We’ll see if this continues, but logically, the Cleveland pitchers aren’t quite as bad as they once were, or as great as they’ve been recently.

[Related: Indians All-Star Break Review: The Starting Rotation]